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Posts tagged ‘Afro-Latinos’

Listen to Los Afro-Latinos on the Speaking to Harmony Radio Show

Did you miss the Speaking to Harmony Radio Show? Our founder Kim Haas was a part of a panel to discuss “The Other America – The Legacy and Struggle of Afro-Latin America” with the goal of widening the notion of the African Diaspora, and to discuss the cultural heritage of the Latin American region.

Don’t worry, the show has been archived and is available for you to listen to here.

The Panel
Melissa Valle- Columbia University
Kim Haas- LosAfrolatinos.com
Maconya – Florida International University
Zarena Leblanc- Florida International University
Denika Mays- Florida International University

 

 

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Los Afro-Latinos on the Speaking to Harmony Radio Show

We are very excited to announce that our founder, Kim Haas, will be a part of a panel on the Speaking to Harmony Radio Show, which is organized by the Sisters in Harmony. Kim will be joining four other panelists, hosted by Sister Calhoun and Dr. Walls, to discuss “The Other America – The Legacy and Struggle of Afro-Latin America” with the goal of widening the notion of the African Diaspora, and to discuss the cultural heritage of the Latin American region.

We hope you will be able to listen in to the discussion. Feel free to call in with any questions or comments you have.

The Panel
Melissa Valle- Columbia University
Kim Haas- LosAfrolatinos.com
Maconya – Florida International University
Zarena Leblanc- Florida International University
Denika Mays- Florida International University

Date: Sunday February 16, 7-9 PM Eastern Standard Time
Bogota, and Cartagena, Colombia 7-9 PM
San Jose, Costa Rica 6-8 PM

Call-in Number:  917-889-7765

Find out more info on the Facebook event page and feel free to invite your friends. 

Hispanic Heritage Month: The African Contribution

by Kim Haas

One of my greatest pleasures is the study of Afro-Latino culture. In September, I had a wonderful opportunity to write about the African contribution to Hispanic Heritage for one of the oldest black newspapers in the United States, New York Amsterdam News. The newspaper, which was founded on a $10 investment more than a century ago, has a distinguished history of being at the forefront of covering major issues and events involving people of African descent.

What an honor to share the article with you!

Vicente Guerrero

Vicente Guerrero

Hispanic Heritage Month, Sept. 15 – Oct. 15, offers an opportunity to illuminate what is too often overlooked—the African influence and tradition in Hispanic culture. Today, approximately 150 million Latin Americans have some African ancestry.

For more than 500 years, Africans and their descendents richly contributed to the fabric of Latin American society. During the Middle Passage, an estimated 12 million enslaved Africans were shipped to the Americas. Of this group, less than 10 percent were brought to the United States. The overwhelming majority were transported to the Caribbean and Latin America, where they provided free labor under exceptionally brutal conditions. They worked on cattle ranches in Brazil, in mines in Colombia, on sugar plantations in Ecuador and in other areas throughout the region.

Read more

1st Annual Afro Latino Festival of New York: Bringing People Together

by Kim Haas

Seeking to unite the diverse Afro-Latino populations, Tania Molina, a proud Garifuna, reached out to her friend Mai-Elka Prado, an Afro-Panamanian. Together, the two Afro-Latinas created the 1st Afro-Latino Festival of New York held Saturday, June 29 at Brooklyn’s Parkside Train Station Plaza.

In the United States, there are an estimated four million Afro-Latinos – the great majority of whom reside in the New York City area. From countries as different as Andean Peru and tropical Cuba, to the Garifuna population of Central America and to the innumerable descendents of Afro-Latinos who may have never set foot in their parents or grandparents homeland, this mega city of eight million is home to Latin America’s African Diaspora. 

Despite the diversity of Afro-Latinos in New York City, when there are gatherings and events, the focus is often on one particular group, nationality or concern like an Afro-Puerto Rican Bomba Performance or an Afro Colombian Land Rights Symposium. Rarely are there events focusing on Afro-Latinos as an entire group. Read more

Exploring Mexico’s African Heritage with Dr. Marco Polo Hernández

by Nicolle Morales Kern

“We need to look deeper into our Africanness to understand ourselves,” says Dr. Marco Polo Hernández, a professor of Spanish and Afro-Hispanic studies at North Carolina Central University, in a recent phone interview. Mexico’s African heritage is not normally discussed or highlighted in conversation, or even education. But, Dr. Hernández, who holds a Ph.D. in Hispanic and Italian Studies from the University of British Columbia, a M.A. in Spanish Language and Peninsular and Latin American literatures, and a B.A. in General Studies & Spanish language and literatures from Portland State University, says that is slowly starting to change. Read more

Roberto Custódio and Fight for Peace Pack Powerful Punch

The London Olympics ended a little over a week ago. And now that the torch has been extinguished, the athletes have returned home and venues are being repurposed, all eyes are on Brazil as Rio de Janeiro prepares to host the 2016 Summer Olympics.

Undoubtedly, Rio is stunning. Considered one of the world’s great playgrounds, it’s an incomparable city. Rio often seems postcard perfect – bathed in bright sunshine, blue skies and tropical rainforests. It’s home to the pulsating rhythms of samba and “beautiful people,” enjoying the beaches of Ipanema and Copacabana. However, there is another side to Rio that’s less glamorous and often tragic – its favelas – the slums perched high above the city, often occupying prime Rio real estate. Favelas have become synonymous with violence; random, unpredictable and yet expected. Case in point, 23 year old Afro-Brazilian Roberto Custódio. Roberto grew up in Complexo do Maré one of the most dangerous favelas in Rio. When he was 13, he witnessed his father’s death by one of the favela gangs. The tragic death left him devastated. Read more

A Filmmaker’s Mission: Shining Light on Afro-Bolivian Invisibility

So, you want to make a documentary film. Should be pretty easy, right? Just grab your camera, shoot, edit and you’re done. Not so fast. The multi-layered processes associated with making a film tends to be a bit more complicated and peppered with lots of starts and stops, especially financing issues. Plus everything else imaginable and some things you just can’t imagine.

In the world of filmmaking, taking on the untold story, the unimaginable and the unthinkable are often what makes film projects so incredibly appealing. Capturing history — whether its life’s smallest moments or biggest events– is often the attraction.

New Yorker Sisa Bueno, an adventurous Latina of African descent and a self-described political junkie, is learning first hand about the starts and stops of filmmaking. As a graduate of the prestigious New York University Film School, Sisa admits, “I had the naïve thought that documentaries were much easier than traditional fiction films, which is completely untrue.” Read more

Clemencia & Francia: In Their Words

By Kim Haas

Part Two of Los Afro-Latinos La Toma Feature

Here we invite you to listen to the interview with Francia Márquez and Clemencia Carabali in Spanish.

Aquí les invitamos escuchar la entrevista con Clemencia Carabali y Francia Márquez en español.

Have you ever felt so committed to a cause that you were willing to risk your life defending it? For most of us, it’s hard to imagine being so strongly dedicated to an ideal, principle or mission. Read more

Gold Rich La Toma in Turmoil

Part One of Los Afro-Latinos La Toma Feature

Today’s headlines are focused on Colombia. Stories regarding the U.S. Secret Service’s prostitution scandal in Cartagena during last month’s Summit of the Americas have brought the South American country to the forefront of international news.

But the scandal you’re not hearing about revolves around La Toma, a small Afro-Colombian community in Cauca, a gold-rich, mountainous region in Colombia’s Pacific southwest. With the price of gold soaring, foreign mining companies are swooping in and forcing out the Afro-Colombian community that has inhabited La Toma for centuries and used small-scale mining for sustenance. Read more

The Afro-Latino Kitchen

“Food is everything,” we were once told. At Los Afro-Latinos, we couldn’t agree more. It’s food that binds us across countries and generations. That’s why we’re starting The Afro-Latino Kitchen.

Once a month, we’ll post about a chef, cook, restaurant, ingredient or Afro-Latino dish. The best part is we’re asking you to share your food memories with us by suggesting favorite restaurants, kiosks, festivals and more. Whether you live in Salvador da Bahia, Brazil; Cartagena, Colombia; or Chicago, Illinois, or anywhere else in the world, we’re asking you to share your food and stories.

With any luck, we’ll be able to cover your favorite Afro-Latino dishes and cooks and share them with our community.

Check back at losafrolatinos.com monthly for a new story from Afro-Latino Kitchen. And send us suggestions on Facebook and Twitter.

Kiosko El Boricua outside of Pinones, Puerto Rico. They’re cooking alcapurrias de jueyes (crabmeat fritters). Many kiosks like this one have been run by the same family for generations.